Berne Convention

The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works is an international agreement governing copyright accepted in Switzerland in 1886.

The Berne Convention requires its signatories to recognize copyright works of other members of the Berne Union in the same way as it recognizes the copyright of its own nationals.

The Berne Convention authorizes countries to allow “fair” uses of copyrighted works in other publications or broadcasts.

The Berne Convention requires its member states to recognize the copyright of works from other member states in the same way it recognizes the copyright of its own nationals. The Berne Convention also requires member states to provide strong minimum standards for copyright law.

Copyright must be automatic. It is prohibited to require formal registration for copyright. The copyright law of the country where copyright is claimed shall also be applied. Berne Convention authorizes countries to allow fair uses of copyrighted works in other publications or broadcasts.

Copyright Protection Duration

All works: a minimum term of at least 50 years after the author’s death. (except photographic and cinematographic)

Photography: a minimum term of 25 years from the year the photograph was created.

Cinematography: a minimum of 50 years after first showing or 50 years after creation if it hasn’t been shown within 50 years after the creation.

error: Content is protected !!